http://tao221.wordpress.com/2011/01/01/the-second-oldest-profession/

Link: http://genealogyresources.blogspot.com/2011_01_01_archive.html

Link: http://www.1880census.com/1880_census_tips.html

¤ 1930 Census - free details for researching 1930 census records
¤ US Census - an summary overview, 1790 - 1940
¤ Genealogy 101 Tips for Beginners & Free forms
¤ NY Arrivals searcing NY passenger arrivals
¤ Vital Records tips at Genealogy Worldwide
¤ Ellis Island (The Statue of Liberty-Ellis Island Foundation)
¤ American Immigrant Wall of Honor at Ellis Island
¤ New York Passenger Lists, detail about the Port of NY
¤ SteveMorse.org (One Step Search Tools)











¤ Castle Garden
¤ APG (Assoc. of Professional Genealogists)
¤ LDS Church (the Mormon Church)
¤ Eastman's Online Genealogy Newsletter (by Dick Eastman)

http://www.genealogyworldwide.com/vital_records.php







http://www.ianatkinson.net/computing/genealogymap.htm
Mapping genealogy data

  • Migration paths - see where particular people suddenly moved a large distance
  • Geographical density/immobility - see which areas the most family members were from
  • Most popular places - see which villages or cities successive generations lived in


http://databases.about.com/od/datamining/a/datamining.htm

http://www.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~ncacgs/images/DataMiningSep2006.pdf

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/GEDCOM

http://genealogy.about.com/od/family_tree_software/a/Genealogy-Gedcom.htm

http://www.ism-journal.com/ITToday/Mining_Databases.pdf

http://genealogy.about.com/gi/o.htm?zi=1/XJ&zTi=1&sdn=genealogy&cdn=parenting&tm=899&f=10&su=p284.9.336.ip_p504.1.336.ip_&tt=2&bt=0&bts=0&zu=http%3A//bettergedcom.wikispaces.com./

http://john.ellingsworth.org/2008/04/data-mining-in-genealogy/

http://mosga.blogspot.com/2007/11/genealogy-data-mining-made-simple.html

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_free_and_open_source_software_packages

http://www.c2.com/cgi/wiki?GenealogyDataMining

http://www.cs.cornell.edu/People/tj/infogen/index.html

http://www.genealogylocator.com/results/mining.html

http://www.downloadatoz.com/file-extensions/download,genealogy+data.html

http://dml.cs.byu.edu/~cgc/pubs/FHTW07.pdf

http://www.socialsecuritydeathindex-search.com/ssdi/2005/09/14/mine-all-data-mine-drew-smith/

http://www.freelancer.com/projects/cgicentral_888179.html
Jobs posted for GEDCOM transfers etc..

http://www.mail-archive.com/ldsoss@lists.ldsoss.org/msg01348.html

http://www.mail-archive.com/ldsoss@lists.ldsoss.org/msg01347.html

BooK: Advanced data Mining and applications: third international conference, ADMA by Reda Alhajj

http://feedraider.com/item/13174817/best-open-source-genealogy-software/

http://www.werelate.org/wiki/Main_Page

http://www.buffalonews.com/city/article89077.ece

http://www.cameraontheroad.com/family/mining-the-wealth-of-online-genealogy-data/

http://www.post-gazette.com/pg/06236/716039-51.stm

digital.library.pitt.edu/pittsburgh

http://sci-gems.math.bas.bg:8080/jspui/bitstream/10525/84/1/ijita15-4-p10.pdf
Information retrieval by using evolutionary strategies

http://dessy0105.wordpress.com/2007/01/26/data-mining/

How data mining works
Data —-> Target Data —–> Preprocessed Data —–> Transformed Data —–> Patterns —–> Knowledge – – > Make decision
Before a data set can be mined, it first has to be “cleaned”. This cleaning process removes errors, ensures consistency and takes missing values into account. Next, computer algorithms are used to “mine” the clean data looking for unusual patterns. Finally, the patterns are interpreted to produce new knowledge.

http://www.wikicfp.com/cfp/servlet/event.showcfp?eventid=10866&copyownerid=11536

http://www.biodatamining.org/ for review on data mining

http://genealogy.about.com/

http://pybrain.org/
Machine language learning in python per Mark cahill


Date issues
http://www.genealogy.com/00000009.html
Dangerous dates
Calendar Switch and Double Dates
Beginning in 45 B.C., many parts of the world used the Julian calendar to mark the passage of time. By the Julian calendar, March 25 was the first day of the year and each year was 365 days and 6 hours long. In 1582, Pope Gregory XIII determined that the Julian calendar was incorrect: each day was just a little bit too long and the human calendar wasn't keeping up with nature's calendar. To solve the problem, Pope Gregory XIII created what is known as the Gregorian calendar. This new calendar changed the first day of the year to January 1 and also jumped ahead by 10 days to make up for the lost time.
The practice of double dating resulted from the switch from the Julian to the Gregorian calendar. Not all countries and people accepted this new calendar at the same time. England and the American colonies didn't officially accept it until 1752. Before that date, the government observed March 25 as the first of the year, but most of the population observed January 1 as the first of the year. For this reason, many people wrote dates falling between January 1 and March 25 with both years, as in the following examples.
Julian or Old Style
Gregorian or New Style
Double Date
December 25, 1718
December 25, 1718
December 25, 1718
January 1, 1718
January 1, 1719
January 1, 1718/19
February 2, 1718
February 2, 1719
February 2, 1718/19
March 20, 1718
March 20, 1719
March 20, 1718/19
March 25, 1719
March 25, 1719
March 25, 1719
By the time England and the colonies adopted the new calendar, the discrepancy between the calendars was eleven days. To resolve the discrepancy, the government ordered that September 2, 1752 be followed by September 14, 1752. Some people also added 11 days to their birth dates (a fact which is not noted on their birth certificates). You should also watch for dates that are recorded as double dates even after all calendars had officially switched. People sometimes accidentally wrote double dates.
Marriage Banns and Intentions
Church records often list the date on which a couple makes the announcement that they intend to marry. These are called marriage banns. In addition, you can find marriage intentions, which were non-religious public announcements of the couple's intention to marry. Don't misinterpret the dates of marriage banns and marriage intentions as the actual wedding date.
Death and Burial Dates
Church and cemetery records often contain the date of the funeral in addition to the date of death. Don't confuse the burial date with the date of death.
Date Formats
When you look at records from other countries, you should be aware of the date format that they use. In the United States, we normally write dates with the month first, the day second, and the year last. For example, we write October 15, 1970 as 10/15/70. However, many other countries reverse the order of the month and day. They write October 15, 1970 as 15/10/70. Since there are only twelve months in the year it is often easy to tell which date format was used because one of the first two numbers is greater than twelve, as in the example above.
If neither of the first two dates is greater than twelve, it is harder to tell which format was used. For example, April 3, 1970 can be written as both 4/3/70 and 3/4/70. If you run into this problem, take a few moments to look at other dates in that group of records. You should eventually run across a date where one of the first two numbers is greater than twelve, and then you'll know the answer to your question.



Link: http://www.progenygenealogy.com/Products/TimelineCharts/ResearchTips.aspx


http://www.progenygenealogy.com/Products/TimelineCharts/GenelinesSampleCharts.aspx


http://www.genealogy.com/mainmenu.html


http://www.gencircles.com/globaltree/instructions


http://www.argenweb.net/crawford/favorite.htm


http://www.gencircles.com/globaltree/instructions
http://genealogy.about.com/od/family_tree_software/qt/How-To-Create-A-Gedcom-File.htm
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Comparison_of_genealogy_software
http://www.eogen.com/GEDCOM
http://homepages.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~pmcbride/gedcom/55gcch1.htm